Monthly Archives: March 2014

In defence of academic book publishers

You will enjoy this piece by Francine O’Sullivan, the UK Publisher for the Management list at Edward Elgar.

 

Her blog post 30 ways academic book publishers add value to the process of research communication makes a very thoughtful contribution to the debate on the role of publishers.

 

Thanks to Colin Steele for bringing this to our attention.

 

Roxanne Missingham

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Creating your own Ebook

Thank you Lisa – great recommendation- a presentation from the recent VAL conference looks terrifically interensting.

 

RMIT Publishing/VALAtech Boot Camp Session B
Creating your own Ebook
1400 – 1730 Room: 218
Facilitator: Christopher Cormack, Catalyst IT, New Zealand

 

Note the VALA website says:

Video recordings of all the concurrent Conference sessions are now exclusively available for VALA members and VALA2014 delegates on the VALA website and can be accessed via the VALA2014 Proceedings menu item or by clicking on the Session title in the Conference Programme. Recordings are provided via the GigTV mediasite so the first time you access any of the recordings you will be asked to register your name and email address.

As for the Conference Papers, to view the recordings you need to be logged in using the username and password provided to you for access of the Conference Papers. If you are a Conference delegate or current VALA member and did not receive a username please email vala@vala.org.auThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

So hopefully coming soon

 

Roxanne

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Survey of University Presses.

 Joseph Esposito has provided a first insight into the data collected in his recent survey which achieved responses from 69 university presses. Writing in The scholarly kitchen he notes that “Most presses reported that they do indeed sell books from their Web sites…The overall impression I am left with from this survey is that D2C sales for university presses are mostly aspirational. On the other hand, with some presses already achieving 3% of sales from their Web sites, that aspiration can be placed into a practical context; 3% is tangible.”

http://scholarlykitchen.sspnet.org/2014/03/24/a-survey-of-university-presses/

 

Roxanne Missingham

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Knowledge Unlatched (KU) – from success to success.

The KU Pilot Collection, a major step in creating a sustainable Open Access for Humanities and Social Sciences books. Now close to 300 libraries from 24 countries have joined. ANU Press has also joined. Knowledge Unlatched is a truly global initiative, involving 137 participating libraries from North America, 77 from the UK, 27 from Australia & New Zealand and 55 from the rest of the world all working together to make the Pilot Collection Open Access.

 

As the target number of 200 was exceeded, the amount that each library is paying per title was reduced from the target average price of $60.00 to under $43.00.

 

See http://www.knowledgeunlatched.org/press-release/

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US Frontiers in Innovation, Research, Science and Technology Act (FIRST) Act.

From SPARC:  The Scholarly Publishing and Academic Research Coalition (SPARC), has announced its opposition to Section 303 of H.R. 4186, the Frontiers in Innovation, Research, Science and Technology Act (FIRST) Act. This provision would impose significant barriers to the public’s ability to access the results of taxpayer-funded research. They argue that it would slow the pace of scientific discovery by restricting public access to articles reporting on federally funded research for up to three years after initial publication

» read more

Roxanne Missingham

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How can existing open access models work for humanities and social science research?

Dr Caroline Edwards, Lecturer in Modern and Contemporary Literature, Birkbeck, University of London and Co-Founder and Co-Director of the Open Library of Humanities write in the latest issue of Insights: the UKSG journal writes about culture, business models and innovation.

She notes that “The OLH proves that academics can become active agents in architecting their own publishing future, working in partnership with both publishers and librarians.”

see the article at http://uksg.metapress.com/content/n722047q8711255u/fulltext.html

Roxanne Missingham 

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First open access eText book published by ANU Press

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The first eText has been published by ANU Press – The joy of Sanskrit by McComas Taylor and Grazia Scotellaro – more exciting titles are on the way in this series.

 

The Joy of Sanskrit is a complete first-year course of twenty-five weeks designed for university students. We teach Sanskrit as a living tradition. This is in recognition of the fact that many of our students have backgrounds in Indic religions and Indian cultural practices, including yoga, art, music, dance and song. As a living tradition, we believe that the reception of language (especially the ability to read), should be balanced with its production (writing, speaking, chanting and singing). With this in view, each weekly unit has three parts: 1. simple Sanskrit conversational patterns, 2. a verse from the oral tradition, and 3. the all-important grammar section. The grammar is based on the textbook Introduction to Sanskrit by Prof. Thomas Egenes. Each week includes introductory videos, audio files to help you with correct pronunciation, and an audio commentary on the text book.

By the end of the course, you will be able to conduct a coherent conversation on a range of simple topics, you be able to chant accurately twenty-six well-known verses, and you will have a good grasp of all the most common grammatical forms, so that you are ready to begin reading simple narratives.

In addition to this Joy of Sanskrit e-text, you will need to purchase Introduction to Sanskrit, Parts 1 and 2. (T. Egenes, Motilal Banarsidass, 3rd edition or later), as it contains all the written exercises and solutions.

The Joy of Sanskrit etext is in ePub format, and you will need multimedia-enabled epub reader to access the video and audio content successfully.

  • If you have an iPad, open The Joy of Sanskrit in iBooks
  • If you have an Android tablet, you will need this app: epubreader
  • If you have a MacBookreader Lite works very well
  • It it not yet possible to view the multimedia content of the ePub in Windows

Please read Conditions of Use before downloading the formats

Download Free Formats

Roxanne Missingham

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