Nature special issue on Impact

Nature special issue on Impact..
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Summary of contents:

Editorial: The maze of metrics http://www.nature.com/news/the-maze-of-impact-metrics-1.13952

Suggests that area is complex with many possible and implemented indicators which needs to be carefully considered to interpret correctly.

 

Dance, Amber Impact: Pack a punch http://www.nature.com/naturejobs/science/articles/10.1038/nj7471-397a

Funders look for research “with a punch”. Tips on how to stand out from the crowd in your application.

 

Hahnel, Mark Referencing: The reuse factor http://www.nature.com/news/referencing-the-reuse-factor-1.13936

The founder of figshare describes the importance of good data management and developments including figshare, Research Data Alliance (founded by ANDS) and the importance of raw data to be made available in papers (eg F1000 Research).

 

Shotton, David Publishing: Open citations http://www.nature.com/news/publishing-open-citations-1.13937

Argues that there is great benefit in make bibliographic citation data freely available. Describes the Open Citations Corpus, including challenges that will need to be addressed for it to be sustainable. For more see http://opcit.eprints.org   

 

Reich , Eugenie Science publishing: The golden club http://www.nature.com/news/science-publishing-the-golden-club-1.13951

Suggests that publishing in a prestige journal (eg Nature) is gives highest reputation and impact. When established, however, there are more options. She notes that in some disciplines, such as Astronomy, open access through preprints is the norm.

 

Owens, Brian Research assessments: Judgement day http://www.nature.com/news/research-assessments-judgement-day-1.13950

Mock REFs, real REF in the UK – universities are tailoring their activities around rankings. Mentions Italy, Australia – with a valuable quote for assessment from Prof Aidan Byrne, CEO, Australian Research Council. Describes concerns from at University and College Union (London) survey of academics and fears that the assessment  “signals a preference for short-term, applied work over basic research that has no obvious, immediate public benefit”. Gives pluses and minuses.

 

Roxanne Missingham

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