Monthly Archives: November 2013

Despite Differences, University Libraries and Presses Partner More Often

New post from Ian Chant – http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2013/11/academic-libraries/despite-differences-university-libraries-and-presses-partner-more-often/ 

Do read – offers some very interesting perspectives from a number of universities.

 

Roxanne Missingham

 

 

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Vice-Chancellor’s blog: Martin Hall on universities as publishers

Well worth a read http://www.corporate.salford.ac.uk/leadership-management/martin-hall/blog/2013/11/universities-as-publishers/

Argues that “Book publishing, though – and scholarly communication in the arts, humanities and social sciences – is far from settled”

 

Great quote from Kathleen Fitzpatrick:

What if the press were re-imagined as part of a university publishing center that, parallel to and in collaboration with the library, served as another pivot point between the institution and the broader scholarly community—if, just as the library brings the world to the university, the press brought the university to the world? What if, rather than serving particular scholarly fields through the current list-based press model, the publishing center instead focused on the need to publish the work produced within the university, making it available for dissemination around the world? How would the press’s function in the scholarly communication process”.

Roxanne Missingham 

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New Open books from SUNY

Congratulations to the State University of New York for publishing two free online open textbooks last month: Literature, the Humanities and Humanity by Theodore Steinberg, and Native Peoples of North America by Professor Susan Stebbins, Ph.D.. They were released as part of Open Access Week

 From the website:

Open SUNY Textbooks is an open access textbook publishing initiative established by State University of New York libraries and supported by SUNY Innovative Instruction Technology Grants. This initiative publishes high-quality, cost-effective course resources by engaging faculty as authors and peer-reviewers, and libraries as publishing infrastructure. The pilot launched in 2012, providing an editorial framework and service to authors, students and faculty, and establishing a community of practice among libraries. The first pilot is publishing 15 titles in 2013, with a second pilot to follow that will add more textbooks and participating libraries.

Roxanne Missingham

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Nature special issue on Impact

Nature special issue on Impact..
» read more

Summary of contents:

Editorial: The maze of metrics http://www.nature.com/news/the-maze-of-impact-metrics-1.13952

Suggests that area is complex with many possible and implemented indicators which needs to be carefully considered to interpret correctly.

 

Dance, Amber Impact: Pack a punch http://www.nature.com/naturejobs/science/articles/10.1038/nj7471-397a

Funders look for research “with a punch”. Tips on how to stand out from the crowd in your application.

 

Hahnel, Mark Referencing: The reuse factor http://www.nature.com/news/referencing-the-reuse-factor-1.13936

The founder of figshare describes the importance of good data management and developments including figshare, Research Data Alliance (founded by ANDS) and the importance of raw data to be made available in papers (eg F1000 Research).

 

Shotton, David Publishing: Open citations http://www.nature.com/news/publishing-open-citations-1.13937

Argues that there is great benefit in make bibliographic citation data freely available. Describes the Open Citations Corpus, including challenges that will need to be addressed for it to be sustainable. For more see http://opcit.eprints.org   

 

Reich , Eugenie Science publishing: The golden club http://www.nature.com/news/science-publishing-the-golden-club-1.13951

Suggests that publishing in a prestige journal (eg Nature) is gives highest reputation and impact. When established, however, there are more options. She notes that in some disciplines, such as Astronomy, open access through preprints is the norm.

 

Owens, Brian Research assessments: Judgement day http://www.nature.com/news/research-assessments-judgement-day-1.13950

Mock REFs, real REF in the UK – universities are tailoring their activities around rankings. Mentions Italy, Australia – with a valuable quote for assessment from Prof Aidan Byrne, CEO, Australian Research Council. Describes concerns from at University and College Union (London) survey of academics and fears that the assessment  “signals a preference for short-term, applied work over basic research that has no obvious, immediate public benefit”. Gives pluses and minuses.

 

Roxanne Missingham

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Open Access and Research Conference 2013

Last week an excellent conference was run by QUT on Open access. It featured a wide range of international and Australian speakers.  The benefits of open access publishing of research outputs and data were well described. You can follow the conversation on Twitter by using the hashtag #oarconf2013. Congratulations to QUT for celebrating the 10th anniversary of their Open Access Policy with such a stellar event.

 

See the conference website at http://www.oar2013.qut.edu.au/

Roxanne Missingham

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Open Access Perspectives in the Humanities and Social Sciences. A collection compiled and edited by the LSE Impact of Social Sciences blog.

It’s rare to see such an interesting group of short focused pieces on open access. The writers include:

Dominique Babini, Open Access Program coordinator at CLACSO-Latin American Council on Social Sciences,
Justin Bzovy a PhD student in the Philosophy Department at Western University.
Velichka Dimitrova project coordinator of Open Economics at the Open Knowledge Foundation.
Fredrick FriendUCL Director Scholarly Communication (now Honorary).
John Holmwood Professor of Sociology at the University of Nottingham.
Heather Morrison Assistant Professor in the École des sciences de l’information / School of Information Studies at the University of Ottawa.
Ernesto Priego Lecturer in Library Science at City University London.
Emma Ryman  a PhD student in philosophy at Western University.
Neil Stewart Digital Repository Manager at City University London.
Alma Swan consultant working in the field of scholarly communication and Director of European Advocacy for the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC).
Jelte Wicherts associate professor at the Department of Methodology and Statistics of Tilburg University.

See the report at http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/files/2013/10/Open-Access-HSS-eCollection.pdf

Roxanne Missingham

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