Monthly Archives: October 2013

Open Access Monographs in the Humanities and Social Sciences Conference Report

Thank you to John Emerson for advising that the conference report is out now for the Jisc Collections and OAPEN Open Access Monographs in the Humanities and Social Sciences conference held at the British Library on the 1 and 2 July 2013.

 

Go to https://www.jisc-collections.ac.uk/Reports/oabooksreport/ to read the report – well worth while!

Roxanne Missingham

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OAPEN-NL A project exploring Open Access monograph publishing in the Netherlands

An extremely important new report – to quote from the release:

 

Open Access publishing has no negative effect on book sales, and increases online usage and discovery considerably. This is one of the conclusions of OAPEN-NL, a project exploring Open Access monograph publishing in the Netherlands. OAPEN-NL’s final report, published yesterday, gives recommendations for research funders, libraries, publishers and authors. The project was conducted by OAPEN Foundation, in collaboration with NWO, SURF and nine academic publishers.

 Kathleen Fitzpatrick’s infectious optimism is more radical – a comprehensive reinvention of scholarly communication, review and distribution:

“What if the press were re-imagined as part of a university publishing center that, parallel to and in collaboration with the library, served as another pivot point between the institution and the broader scholarly community—if, just as the library brings the world to the university, the press brought the university to the world? What if, rather than serving particular scholarly fields through the current list-based press model, the publishing center instead focused on the need to publish the work produced within the university, making it available for dissemination around the world? How would the press’s function in the scholarly communication process”.

Roxanne Missingham

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Library Publishing Directory

The Library Publishing Coalition has announced the publication of the first edition of the Library Publishing Directory

 “The Library Publishing Directory provides a snapshot of the publishing activities of 115 academic and research libraries (primarily in North America), including information about the number and types of publications they produce, the services they offer authors, how they are staffed and funded, and the future plans of institutions that are engaged in this growing sector of scholarly publishing. 

In documenting the breadth and depth of activities in this field, this resource aims to articulate the unique value of library publishing; establish it as a significant and growing community of practice; and to raise its visibility within a number of stakeholder communities, including administrators, funding agencies, other scholarly publishers, librarians, and content creators.”

 

 Download the Open Access version of the Directory or order a print copy via Purdue University PressAmazon, or Barnes and Noble.

 

Kathleen Fitzpatrick’s infectious optimism is more radical – a comprehensive reinvention of scholarly communication, review and distribution:

“What if the press were re-imagined as part of a university publishing center that, parallel to and in collaboration with the library, served as another pivot point between the institution and the broader scholarly community—if, just as the library brings the world to the university, the press brought the university to the world? What if, rather than serving particular scholarly fields through the current list-based press model, the publishing center instead focused on the need to publish the work produced within the university, making it available for dissemination around the world? How would the press’s function in the scholarly communication process”.

Roxanne Missingham

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The death of the academic book and the path to Open Access

Follow the debate and read the article on The conversation at https://theconversation.com/the-death-of-the-academic-book-and-the-path-to-open-access-19153

Roxanne Missingham

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Oxford University Press joins OAPEN

OUP has joined OAPEN-UK, a collaborative research project exploring open access (OA) scholarly monograph publishing in the humanities and social sciences.

OAPEN-UK is co-funded by Jisc and the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

OAPEN-UK now has more than 1770 titles available on open access through their website.

For more information see http://www.jisc.ac.uk/news/oxford-university-press-joins-oapen-uk-project-30-sep-2013

Roxanne Missingham

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Letter to the Editor of The Australian

Dear Editor

In The Saturday Australian Ms Adler has suggested that the book industry is failing and university presses operating under libraries publishing open access books produce second rate publications.

In 2013 Australian book publishing is part of an international industry. Australian university press publishing has achieved significant impact for Australian research. The open access publishing of many Australian universities has produced high international access to the nation’s research (over 65% of downloads of these books are from overseas). Studies have shown that the return on investment for works published via open access funded by the Australian government is up to 10 times greater than for works that are not open access.

Australian open access university presses operating under libraries have been great innovators. New technologies are also at the core of our e-book production. Books are produced in formats that can be read on Kindles and iPads. Multimedia has been incorporated into works, such as audio visual material included in the Sounds in Translation: Intersections of music, technology and society from ANU E Press.

Books published by university presses run by libraries have won national awards Peter Fitzpatrick’s book The two Frank Thrings published by Monash University Press won the National Biography Award 2013.

With over a million downloads a year and over 1000 titles, university presses operating under libraries significantly contribute to Australian book publishing and reading.

Publishing open access increases the intellectual property protection for authors because their works are highly visible and records as their scholarly outputs. It is a Furfy to suggest that open access undermines copyright.

Book publishing, including scholarly publishing needs to build on funded research and adapt to use new technology. No argument can be made for permanent subsidies to underpin the industry as a whole. Developing yet another website costing millions of dollars would be wasteful of government resources which could be better spent on research and innovative publishing projects.

Yours faithfully

Roxanne

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Roxanne Missingham
University Librarian (Chief Scholarly Information Services)

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